Nontraditional Retirement Community

The city is beginning to recognize that its growing population of senior citizens does not want to live in nursing homes. They are looking into building a nontraditional retirement community downtown but need to know more about how they can design an environment that empowers seniors to be self-sufficient while still providing support and assistance.

Pre-Research Design Needs & Considerations 

Empowerment, self-sufficiency, and assistance are three key areas that need to be addressed with the current nursing home model. Retirees need to have ownership beyond a name plate outside a sterile apartment, the ability to grocery shop and run errands, and the availablity for physical help when needed.

Expectations 

The retirement community should have the propensity to facilitate both the needs of the residents and their families. A warm and welcoming communal lounge conducive to relaxing and enjoying the company of others is imperative. Additionally, customization & renovation of apartments to reflect self-identity and individuality is strongly encouraged.

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Interceptions

Going out into the public and meeting interesting and engaging Cleveland seniors was a large part of our research strategy. Their individual thoughts and perspectives gave our team detailed insight on the life of an everyday senior citizen. This primary source of education was critical in order for our team to define and explore their living experience, and ultimately redesign a new one. 

We encountered a wide variety of senior citizens while exploring E. 4th, Euclid Avenue, Tower City, and the West Side Market. Not all interceptions were willing to share their experiences, but those who were had mostly positive things to say about their living environments and quality of life. Negative experiences were not encountered until the final interviews at Winton Manor, which is subsidized senior housing for both the elderly and physically disabled.

First We looked on a map to locate existing senior communities. 
Second We intercepted 5 different Cleveland seniors and gathered information about their living situations.
Finally We returned back the the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative to review our findings. Plan, Do, Review. 

User Journey

User Journey

Elements + Touchpoints

Mobility
Mobility needs to incorporate easily accessible bus stops and transportation, as well as enclosed parking. Seniors are less likely to travel when in bad weather conditions, so options are needed. Having the choice to drive or commute by rapid transit creates choice. Additionally, car-pooling, planned outings, community can be fostered  the resident

Accessibility 
The city is beginning to recognize that its growing population of senior citizens does not want to live in nursing homes. They are looking into building a nontraditional retirement community downtown but need to know more about how they can design an environment that empowers seniors to be self-sufficient while still providing support and assistance.

Ownership 
Ownership needs to entail more attention to detail than placing name plates outside sterile apartments that could be found in traditional retirement homes. Prospective members require Decorating the apartment is a reflection of personal taste and style and is important leading into the self-actualization pillar.

Self-Actualization 
Tenants autonomy needs to be maintained while providing and not encouraging group dinners and trips. The objective is to empower residents by enabling them to take control and decide how to decorate their homes, participate in optional activities, and grow as a person.

Community 
The ideal non-traditional retirement community would consist of 55+ age group. There should be a 1-2 person limit per household and consist of older professionals, retirees, and widowers to promote diversity among the community. The ideal resident will want to remain active within the community ranging from scheduled events, regular exercise, and socialization helping to promote an active lifestyle.

Security 
Secure entrances, parking, and doorman are desirable in order to prevent threat of robbery or harm to the retirement community.

Accessibility 
The city is beginning to recognize that its growing population of senior citizens does not want to live in nursing homes. They are looking into building a nontraditional retirement community downtown but need to know more about how they can design an environment that empowers seniors to be self-sufficient while still providing support and assistance.

Ownership 
Ownership needs to entail more attention to detail than placing name plates outside sterile apartments that could be found in traditional retirement homes. Prospective members require decorating the apartment is a reflection of personal taste and style and is important leading into the self-actualization pillar.

Self-Actualization 
Tenants autonomy needs to be maintained while providing and not encouraging group dinners and trips. The objective is to empower residents by enabling them to take control and decide how to decorate their homes, participate in optional activities, and grow as a person.

Community 
The ideal non-traditional retirement community would consist of 55+ age group. There should be a 1-2 person limit per household and consist of older professionals, retirees, and widowers to promote diversity among the community. The ideal resident will want to remain active within the community ranging from scheduled events, regular exercise, and socialization helping to promote an active lifestyle.


Security
Secure entrances, parking, and doorman are desirable in order to prevent threat of robbery or harm to the retirement community.